Employment and Paychecks Grew in August: September 3 – 7

Employers added workers again as wage inflation appears to be building a bit. Here are the five things we learned from U.S. economic data released during the week ending September 7.

#1The jobs market (and wages) heated up in August. Nonfarm employment grew by a seasonally adjusted 201,000 workers during the month, up from a 147,000 jobs gain in July, and the 95th straight month of expanding payrolls. The Bureau of Labor Statistics also indicates that private sector employers added 204,000 workers during the month, split between 26,000 in the goods-producing side of the economy and 178,000 in the service sector. Industries adding the most workers during the month included professional/business services (+53,000), health care/social assistance (+40,700), construction (+23,000), wholesale trade (+22,400), and transportation/warehousing (+20,200). The average number of hours worked held steady for the month at 34.5 hours (August 2017: 34.4 hours). Average weekly earnings grew by $3.45 to $937.02, up 3.2 percent from a year earlier, the 5th time the 12-month comparable was at or above 3.0 percent in 2018. For much of this economic recovery, the year-to-year percentage gains ranged between 1.5 and 2.5 percent.Wage Gains 2012-2018 090718

Based on a separate survey of households, the unemployment rate held steady at 3.9 percent, just above the current economic recovery low reading of 3.8 percent achieved in May. At the same time, the labor force contracted by 469,000, resulting in the labor force participation rate slipping by 2/10ths of a percentage point to 62.7 percent. The labor force participation rate for adults aged 25 to 54 was at 82.0 percent, down 1/10th of a point for the month. The typical length of unemployment shrank by 4/10ths of a week to 9.1 weeks (August 2018: 10.3 weeks) while the number of part-time workers seeking a full-time job shrank to another post-recession low at 4.379 million people (August 2017: 5.209 million). The broad measure of labor underutilization by the BLS (the U-6 series) also contracted to a post-recession low of 7.4 percent. A year earlier, the same measure was at 8.6 percent.

#2The trade deficit widened to its largest reading since February. The Census Bureau and Bureau of Economic Analysis tell us that exports dropped by $2.1 billion to $211.1 billion (+8.2 percent versus July 2017) while imports grew by $2.2 billion to $261.2 billion (+9.1 percent versus July 2017). The resulting trade deficit of $50.1 billion was up $4.3 billion for the month, a 13.3 percent increase from a year earlier, and the largest trade deficit in five months. The goods deficit surged by $4.2 billion to $73.1 billion (+11.8 percent versus July 2017) while the services surplus slipped by $0.1 billion to +$23.1 billion (+8.7 percent versus July 2017). The former fell in part because of lower exports of civilian aircraft and soybeans and increased imports of computers/accessories, fuel/crude oil and automotive vehicles. The U.S. had its largest goods deficits with China (-$34.1 billion), European Union (-$14.5 billion), and Mexico (-$6.4 billion).

#3Factory orders softened in July but remained well ahead of year-ago levels. The Census Bureau estimates new orders for manufactured goods dropped 0.8 percent during the month to a seasonally adjusted $497.8 billion (+9.0 percent versus July 2017). New orders for transportation goods slumped 5.2 percent, pulled down by declines for both civilian (-35.4 percent) and defense (-34.4 percent) aircraft. Net of transportation goods, orders inched up 0.2 percent to $414.7 billion (+8.4 percent versus July 2017). New orders for civilian capital goods net of aircraft (a measure of business investment) increased 1.6 percent. Shipments improved for the 14th time in 15 months, albeit with a gain of less than 0.1 percent to $501.7 billion (+8.1 percent versus July 2017). The value of unfilled orders of manufactured goods also grew by less than 0.1 percent to $1.165 trillion while inventories expanded by 0.8 percent to $675.8 billion (the 21st straight monthly gain).

#4Purchasing managers describe strengthening in both the manufacturing and service sectors. The Institute for Supply Management reports that the headline index from its Report on Business in manufacturing (PMI) jumped by 3.2 points during August to a seasonally adjusted 61.3. The measure has been above a reading of 50.0—indicative of an expanding manufacturing sector—for 24 straight months. All five components of the PMI improved during the month: new orders (+4.9 points), production (+4.8 points), supplier deliveries (+2.4 points), inventories (+2.1 points), and employment (+2.0 points). Sixteen of 18 tracked manufacturing industries reported growth, led by computers/electronics, apparel, and textile mills. The press release notes that manufacturers were “overwhelmingly concerned” about impacts of tariffs will have on their business.

The ISM’s measure of nonmanufacturing activity (NMI) added 2.8 points during August to a seasonally adjusted 58.5, the 103rd consecutive month above the expansion/contraction threshold of 50.0. All four NMI components grew from their July readings: business activity/production (+4.2 points), new orders (+3.4 points), supplier deliveries (+3.0 points), and employment (up 6/10ths of a point to 56.7). Sixteen of 18 nonmanufacturing industries gained during August, led by construction, transportation/warehousing, and retail. Per the press release, survey respondents “remain positive about business conditions and the economy” but also report that “logistics, tariffs and employment resources” having an impact on their business.

#5Vehicle sales held modest in August. Light vehicle retail sales were at a seasonally adjusted annualized rate (SAAR) of 16.72 million units during the month, according to individual automaker sales reports tabulated by Autodata. This was off 0.3 percent from July and up 0.8 percent from a year earlier (although it is worth noting that year ago sales were suppressed by Hurricane Harvey making the 12-month comparable even less impressive). The light truck/SUV sales story improved—growing 2.5 percent during the month to 9.37 million units SAAR (+9.2 percent versus August 2017). Weakness continued on the car side of the market as sales slumped 4.1 percent to 3.77 million units (-15.5 percent versus August 2017).

Other U.S. economic data released over the past week:
Jobless Claims (week ending September 1, 2018, First-Time Claims, seasonally adjusted): 203,000 (-10,000 vs. previous week; -90,000 vs. the same week a year earlier). 4-week moving average: 209,500 (-16.5% vs. the same week a year earlier).
Construction Spending (July 2018, Value of Construction Put in Place, seasonally adjusted annualized rate: $1.315 trillion (+0.1% vs. June 2018, +5.8% vs. July 2017).
Productivity (2nd Quarter 2018-revised, Nonfarm Labor Productivity, seasonally adjusted annualized rate): +2.9% vs. 2018Q1, +1.3% vs. 2017Q2.

The opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of Kevin’s current employer. No endorsements are implied.

 

Payrolls Expand, Unemployment Falls: July 30 – August 3

The frantic pace of hiring cooled a bit while the Fed takes a break. Here are the five things we learned from U.S. economic data released during the week ending August 3.  

#1Employers added fewer jobs while the unemployment rate fell during July. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports nonfarm employers added a seasonally adjusted 157,000 workers during the month. This was down from the sharply upward estimates of May and June job creation of 268,000 and 248,000, respectively, but also represented the 94th straight month of payroll expansion. The private sector added 170,000 jobs during July while the public sector shed 13,000 workers. The former was split between 52,000 new jobs in the goods-producing sector and 118,000 added workers in the service sector. Industries adding the most workers were professional/business services (+51,000), leisure/hospitality (+40,000), manufacturing (+37,000), and health care/social assistance (+33,500). The average hour week slowed by 1/10th of an hour to 34.5 hours (July 2017: 34.4 hours) while mean hourly wages grew by seven cents to 27.05 (July 2017: 26.34). The resulting average weekly earnings of $933.23 was up 3.0 percent from a year earlier.

The unemployment rate slipped by 1/10th of a percentage point to 3.9 percent, just above the 3.8 percent post-recession low achieved in May (July 2017: 4.3 percent). 105,000 people entered the labor market during the July, which kept the labor force participation rate at 62.9 percent. The labor participation rate for adults aged 25-54 eked out a 1/10th of a point increase to 82.1 percent. The median length of unemployment jumped to 9.5 weeks (up 6/10ths of a week from June but still under July 2017’s median of 10.4 weeks). The count of “involuntary” part-time workers—part-time workers who seek a full-time opportunity—dropped by 172,000 to 4.567 million people (July 2017: 3.233 million). Finally, the broadest measure of labor underutilization by the BLS (the “U-6” series) fell to a post-recession low of 7.5 percent, down 3/10ths of a point from June and a full percentage point of July 2017.labor underutilization 080318

#2The Fed does not surprise (i.e., does nothing). The policy statement released following last week’s meeting of the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) continued to characterize economic growth as being “at a strong rate” and the labor market as having “continued to strengthen.” Further, it sees core inflation being near its two-percent target rate while consumer and business investment spending having “grown strongly.” Looking towards the future, the Fed sees risks to be “roughly balanced” between those on the upside and downside. As a result, the FOMC voted unanimously to maintain the fed funds target rate at a range between 1.75 and 2.00 percent, a policy that the statement called “accommodative.” The general consensus has the FOMC going for a quarter-point rate hike at its next meeting in September. 

#3The trade deficit grew for the first time in four months during June. The Census Bureau and Bureau of Economic Analysis estimates exports slowed by $1.5 billion to $213.8 billion (+9.8 percent versus June 2017) while imports increased by $1.6 billion to $260.2 billion (+8.6 percent versus June 2017). The resulting trade deficit of -$46.3 billion was up $3.6 billion from May and 3.4 percent larger than June 2017’s deficit. The trade deficit for the first six months of 2018 totaled -$291.2 billion, up 7.2 percent from the same six months in 2017 and 17.7 percent from the first six months in 2016. The goods deficit grew by $3.1 billion during June to -$68.8 billion while the services surplus was virtually unchanged at +$22.5 billion. In the case of the former, exports of goods dropped by $1.7 billion (including declines in exports of pharmaceutical preparations, jewelry, automobiles, and civilian aircraft (and engines)). Imports of goods grew by $1.4 billion, led by increases for pharmaceutical preparations and crude oil. The U.S. had its largest goods deficits with China (-32.5 billion), the European Union (-$12.8 billion), and Mexico (-$6.7 billion).

#4Consumer spending held firm during the last days of spring. Real personal consumption expenditures (PCE) grew 0.3 percent on a seasonally adjusted basis during June, according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis. Spending on durable goods and services each increased 0.4 percent while that on nondurable goods slipped 0.1 percent. Without adjustments for inflation, nominal PCE grew 0.4 percent, matching the change in nominal personal income and nominal disposable income. After adjusting for price variation, real disposable personal income gained 0.3 percent during June. The savings rate remained steady at +6.8 percent (note that both the savings rate and income data series were revised upward with the publication of this report). Over the past year, real spending has grown 2.8 percent (its best 12-month comparable since last November) while real disposable has increased 3.1 percent (its best 12-month comparable since October 2015).

#5Businesses appear concerned about the possible effects of tariffs. The Institute for Supply Management’s Purchasing Managers Index (PMI) shed 2.1 points during the month to a reading of 58.1. This was the 23rd straight month in which the PMI was above a reading of 50.0, indicative of an expanding manufacturing sector. Three of the five PMI components declined during July: supplier deliveries (-6.1 points to 62.1), production (-3.8 points to 62.3), and new orders (-3.3 points to 60.2). Rising were measures for inventories (+2.5 points to 53.3) and employment (up a half point to 56.5). Seventeen of 18 tracked manufacturing industries expanded during the month, led by textile mills, electrical equipment/appliances, and apparel. The press release notes that survey respondents were “overwhelmingly concerned about how tariff-related activity” will impact their business.

The ISM’s measure for business activity in the service sector also slumped as the NMI dropped by 3.4 points to 55.7. Even if this is the lowest reading for the NMI since last August, it represented the 102nd consecutive month with the index indicating an expansion of the service sector. Three of four NMI components fell from the June readings: business activity/production (down 7.4 points to 56.5), new orders (down 6.2 points to 57.0), and supplier deliveries (off 2.5 points to 53.0).  Improving was the measure tracking employment (up 2.5 points to 56.1). Sixteen of 18 tracked nonmanufacturing industries grew during July, led by mining, public administration, and agriculture/forestry/fishing/hunting. The press release blames the “cooling off” of the service sector on concerns about “tariffs and deliveries.” 

Other U.S. economic data released over the past week:
Jobless Claims (week ending July 28, 2018, First-Time Claims, seasonally adjusted): 218,000 (+1,000 vs. previous week; -25,000 vs. the same week a year earlier). 4-week moving average: 214,500 (-11.4% vs. the same week a year earlier).
Factory Orders (June 2018, New Orders for Manufactured Goods, seasonally adjusted): $501.7 billion (+0.7% vs. May 2018, +6.1% vs. June 2017).
Pending Home Sales (June 2018, Index (2001=100), seasonally adjusted): 106.9 (+0.9% vs. May 2018, -2.5%
Vehicle Sales (July 2018, Light Vehicle Retail Sales, seasonally adjusted annualized rate): 16.77 million vehicles (-2.7% vs. June 2018, -0.1% vs. July 2017).
Construction Spending (June 2018, Value of Construction Put in Place): $1.317 trillion (-1.1% vs. May 2018, +6.1% vs. June 2017).
Conference Board Consumer Confidence (July 2018, Index (1985=100), seasonally adjusted): 127.4 (May 2018: 127.1).
Case-Shiller Home Price Index (May 2018, 20-City Index, seasonally adjusted): +0.2% vs. April 2018, +6.5% vs. May 2017). 

The opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of Kevin’s current employer. No endorsements are implied.

Hiring Remains Firm, Trade Deficit Shrinks: July 2 – 6

Employers continued to hire in June while the trade deficit fell to a 1.5 year low in May. Here are the five things we learned from U.S. economic data released during the week ending July 6.  

#1The labor market remained hot during the open days of summer. Nonfarm employers expanded their payrolls by 213,000 workers, per the Bureau of Labor Statistics. While down from the 244,000 added jobs in May, it essentially matched the 213,700 monthly average of the past year. Private sector employers added 202,000 jobs during June, split by 53,000 workers in the goods-producing side of the economy and 149,000 positions in the service sector. Industries adding the most jobs during the month were professional/business services (+50,000), manufacturing (+36,000), health care/social assistance (+34,700), and leisure/hospitality (+25,000). Retailers, on the other hand, shed 21,600 workers during the month. The average workweek remained at 34.5 hours (June 2017: 34.4 hours) while average hourly wages inched up by five cents. The resulting average weekly earnings of $903.81 was up 3.0 percent.Job Gains-2008-2018 070618

A separate survey of households found the unemployment rate jumping 2/10ths of a percentage point to 4.0 percent (June 2017: 4.3 percent). The good news is that this was the result of 601,000 people entering the labor force during the month. As a result, the labor force participation rate also grew by 2/10ths of a percentage point to 62.9 percent. Labor force participation remains below pre-recession levels, although that partially (but not totally) reflects an aging populace. The labor force participation rate for adults 25 to 54 was 88.9 percent in June, down 2/10ths of a percentage point from May but up 4/10ths of a percentage point from a year earlier. There is some progress still needed here too—the 25-54 participation rate was about two full percentage points higher during the previous economic expansion. Falling to post-recession lows were the median length of unemployment (8.9 weeks) and the number of people with a part-time job seeking a full-time opportunity (4.743 million people). The BLS’s broadest measure of labor underutilization (the “U-6” series) shed 2/10ths of a percentage point to 7.8 percent, matching its post-recession low.

#2The trade deficit narrowed to its smallest reading in 19 months. The Census Bureau and the Bureau of Economic Analysis report that exports grew by $4.1 billion to $215.3 billion (+11.7 percent versus May 2017) while imports increased by a more modest $1.1 billion to $258.4 billion (+8.3 percent versus May 2017). As a result, the trade deficit contracted by $3.0 billion to -$43.1 billion, down 6.0 percent from a year earlier and its smallest reading since October 2016. The goods deficit narrowed by $2.6 billion to -$65.8 billion (off 1.5 percent from May 2017) while the goods surplus widened by $450 million to +$22.7 billion (up 8.5 percent from May 2017). The former included the impact of a $3.6 billion rise in exported goods (including sizable gains for civilian aircraft and soybeans). The U.S. had its largest goods deficits in May with China (-$32.0 billion), the European Union (-$11.9 billion), and Japan (-$5.7 billion).

#3Factory orders grew during May, thanks to a gain in nondurable goods. New orders of manufactured goods increased 0.4 percent during the month to a seasonally adjusted $498.2 billion. This represented the Census Bureau measure’s third gain in four months, leaving new factory orders up 9.2 percent from a year earlier. Durable goods orders decreased 0.4 percent (an improvement from the 0.6 percent decline previously reported). Falling were orders for transportation goods (-1.1 percent), fabricated metals (-1.1 percent), primary metals (-0.3 percent), and computers/electronics (-0.2 percent) while machinery (+1.2 percent) and furniture orders (+1.1 percent) both increased. Nondurable goods orders grew 1.1 percent during the month. Nondefense capital goods net of aircraft—a proxy of business investment—inched up 0.3 percent. Shipments grew for the 12th time in 13 months with a 0.6 percent increase to $496.1 billion (+7.2 percent versus May 2017). Durable goods shipments gained by less than 0.1 percent while those of nondurables rose 1.1 percent. Unfilled orders grew for the sixth time in seven months (+0.5 percent to $1.161 trillion) while inventories expanded for the 19th time in 20 months (+0.2 percent to $668.4 billion)

#4Purchasing managers signal business activity expanded during June. The Institute for Supply Management’s Purchasing Managers Index (PMI) added 1.5 points to a seasonally adjusted reading of 60.2. This was the 22nd straight month in which the PMI has been above a reading of 50.0, which is indicative of an expanding manufacturing sector. Three of five PMI components improved from their May readings: supplier deliveries (up 6.2 points to 68.2), production (up 8/10ths of a point to 62.3), and inventories (up 6/10ths of a point to 50.8). The new orders and employment components each suffered small declines. Respondents from 17 of the 18 tracked manufacturing sectors reported growth during June, led by textile mills, wood products, and nonmetallic mineral products. Survey respondents expressed concerns about “employment resources and supply chains [that] continue to struggle,” and “how tariff related activity is and will continue to affect their business.”

The ISM’s measure for the nonmanufacturing sector of the economic added a half point to a seasonally adjusted 59.1. The NMI has been above the expansionary/contractionary threshold for 101 consecutive months. Only two of the NMI’s four components gained during the month: new orders (up 2.7 points to 63.2) and business activity/production (up 2.6 points to 63.9). The employment and supplier deliveries components both lost ground during June. Seventeen of 18 tracked service sector industries grew during the month, led by mining, wholesale trade, and retail. The press release reported that while survey respondents were “optimistic,” they were concerned about “tariffs, capacity constraints, and delivery.”

#5Construction spending grew in May. The Census Bureau estimates the seasonally adjusted annualized value of construction put into place increased 0.4 percent during the month to $1.309 trillion. This was 4.5 percent ahead of the year-ago rate. Private sector spending grew 0.3 percent to an annualized $1.005 trillion (+4.4 percent versus May 2017). Private sector residential construction spending expanded 0.8 percent during the month while private sector nonresidential construction spending slowed 0.3 percent (including falling activity in both the manufacturing and commercial sectors). Public sector spending was at an annualized $301.1 billion, up 0.7 percent for the month and 4.7 percent over the past year.

Other U.S. economic data released over the past week:
Jobless Claims (week ending June 30, 2018, First-Time Claims, seasonally adjusted): 231,000 (+3,000 vs. previous week; -20,000 vs. the same week a year earlier). 4-week moving average: 224,500 (-8.2% vs. the same week a year earlier).
Vehicle Sales (June 2018, Light Vehicle Sales, seasonally adjusted annualized rate): 17.47 million vehicles (+3.3% vs. May 2018, +4.6% vs. June 2017).
FOMC Meeting Minutes

The opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of Kevin’s current employer. No endorsements are implied.